The Rotary Club of
Hastings Western Port
Chartered 1969
The Channel
Monday 1st May 2017
May - Youth Service Month
Club Information
Welcome to Rotary Club of Hastings Western Port
Hastings Western Port
Service Above Self
We meet Mondays at 6:00 PM
The Hastings Club Marine Parade Hastings
155 Marine Parade
Hastings, VIC  3915
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Rotary International President
Mr John Germ
District Governor: 
Mrs Lynne Westland
District Governor Elect:
Mr Don Ripper
Linda Humphries
Mark Humphries
Derryck Rees
Upcoming Events
Susan Berg
Hastings Club
May 08, 2017
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Susan Berg
May 08, 2017
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
May 21, 2017
Dromana Changeover
Safety Beach Sailing Club
Jun 22, 2017
6:00 PM – 8:30 PM
Birthdays & Anniversaries
Join Date
Alan Clifford Young
April 30, 2007
10 years
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When we introduced Rotary Club Central in 2012, it revolutionized goal tracking and planning for clubs and districts — no more filling out paper club-planning forms or passing along boxes of historical club information every time a new leader took office. Rotary Club Central offered clubs and districts a quantifiable way to begin measuring local and global impact, specifically membership initiatives, service activities, and Rotary Foundation giving. But as with any technological advancement, in a few short years, Rotary Club Central began to show its age, and Rotarians took notice. They...
At its January 2017 meeting, the Rotary International Board of Directors adopted a new zone structure for Rotary clubs. Rotary bylaws require the Board to complete a comprehensive review of the 34 Rotary zones no less often than every eight years to ensure that each zone has an approximately equal number of Rotarians. The Board’s previous review of the zones occurred in 2008. The Board earlier approved the creation of three regional workgroups to develop rezoning proposals for Asia, Europe/Africa, and the Americas. These workgroups comprised one representative (either a current director,...
Through The Rotary Foundation, Rotary members have supported thousands of projects that promote peace, fight disease, provide clean water, save mothers and children, support education, and grow local economies. We’ve also led the fight to eradicate polio worldwide. As part of our celebration of the Foundation’s centennial, we’re honoring 20 global grant projects with special recognition. Learn more about the projects using our interactive map.
The Atlanta Host Organization Committee is offering some good old-fashioned Southern hospitality at the Rotary International Convention from 10 to 14 June. It has planned a wide range of activities featuring everything from good food and music to inspiring tours of local landmarks. If it’s your first convention, these events are chances to meet fellow Rotarians from around the world, and if you’re an experienced convention goer, you can catch up with old friends. Hall of Fame baseball player Hank Aaron will host Rotarians for a “Strike Out Polio” night at the new SunTrust Park, where you’ll...
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Mark Humphries
President's Message
Linda Humphries
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May is Youth Service Month
Rotary offer many programs to a wide range of people and groups. Rotary has a group of special programs aimed specifically at youth. Over the years Rotary has created many programs that can enrich lives of young people, programs like Interactor clubs for students attending school to Group Study Exchange for young adults. As with all programs that Rotary provide, the programs have one thing in common, they all have an educational element that is designed to push the student out of their comfort zone. Along the way they are encouraged and nurtured and supported by our great organisation.
Some of Rotary’s programs that supported by our District include:
Rotary Youth Exchange Australia –
For students aged 15-17 who are interested in travelling and experiencing a new culture. Through Rotary Youth Exchange, you will spend a year studying abroad living with Rotary volunteer host families who will introduce you to a new culture, language, and lifestyle in one of over 12 countries. 
National Youth Science Forum - NYSF FIND OUT MORE
For Year 11 students passionate about science, NYSF gives an opportunity to visit a large variety of some of Australia’s leading scientific facilities and talk to many of our top scientists enabling informed career choices to be made. It's also a fantastic opportunity to meet like-minded people and establish professional relations and life-long friendships.
Rotaract and Interact FIND OUT MORE
Be part of a club for young people like you who want to join together to tackle issues in your community that you care most about. Through Interact, you can: Carry out hands-on service projects ... Make international connections... Develop leadership skills, and... Have fun! Rotaract is for young adults aged 18 - 30 years.                   Interact is for 14-18 year olds - often based in schools or within the community. 
RYLA is a 7 day residential leadership seminar for aspiring leaders aged 18 - 25 years. The week incorporates a lot of self development through a variety of mechanisms including reflection (individually & as a team), team work, sports and outdoor activities, dancing and many others. Participants can sieze the opportunity to develop leadership, communication and problem solving skills, can practice new behaviours, forge life-long friends and challenge their own personal belief systems and values.
RYPEN provides a group of young people aged 15-17 an opportunity to develop valuable leadership skills. This weekend long program will see you engage with like-minded people, while having fun and learning new skills in areas such as problem solving and public speaking. On top of learning these skills RYPEN will give you a chance to put them to practical use, through debate and physical activity.
Model United Nations – MUNA
The purpose of the Rotary Model United Nations Assembly (or MUNA, pronounced 'mew-na') is to encourage young people to learn about other countries and to develop an understanding of the workings of the United Nations. Delegates will also develop debating skills, gain self-confidence in public speaking and leadership skills. In many cases, long term friendships are also made through MUNA.
These are just a couple of the great Rotary initiatives that are provided, we have many great youth in our region that could benefit from such great programs of education.
more information about Rotary Youth Programs can be found at
New Book

New book praises Rotary's role in fight to end polio


“Who decided to rid the world of polio? Not politicians or global health organizations, as you might expect,” she writes, in one of several chapters devoted to polio. “The starting gun was fired by Rotary International, a network of businessmen more used to enjoying convivial dinners, raising money for local good causes, and organizing floats to carry Santa Claus around suburban neighborhoods at Christmas.”

Bartlett offers a comprehensive, readable account of the polio-eradication campaign’s history and Rotary’s unlikely role as its chief advocate. From epidemiologist John Sever’s early suggestion that Rotary adopt ending polio as an organizational mission to the first immunization drives in the Philippines and Central and South America, the world community doubted both the idea of a campaign targeting a single disease and Rotary’s capacity as a volunteer organization to execute it.

The narrative traces Rotary’s mission to reach all the world’s children with Albert Sabin’s polio vaccine, the formation of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI), and the struggle to interrupt transmission in the world’s poorest communities, particularly in densely populated countries like India, which has not reported a new case since 2011.

“Polio eradication is a twentieth-century dream, conceived by idealists and driven by big international institutions and mass mobilizations of volunteers, working together to make a better world for all,” Bartlett writes. “It must succeed or fail, however, in a twenty-first century marked by factionalism, religious intolerance, and rising inequality.”

Aziz Memon, chair of Rotary’s National PolioPlus Committee in Pakistan, is interviewed about the challenges facing his country, one of the few where polio remains endemic and conflict has slowed progress. Carol Pandak, director of PolioPlus at Rotary headquarters, weighs in on the contributions of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, in both funding and high-profile advocacy. Other prominent voices from Rotary’s GPEI partners chime in throughout.

Based in London, Bartlett has previously worked in politics and written for Newsweek and Wired. She’s produced documentary films and written nonfiction books, including a biography of musician Dusty Springfield and a collaboration with Anne Frank’s stepsister Eva Schloss on Schloss’ memoirs.

Susan Berg

The Girl Who Lived is the true story of a teenage girl's fight to find happiness.


At fifteen, Susan Berg was on a boat trip with her parents and brother when their vessel began to sink. Desperate to find help, she swam ahead, struggling through darkness and rough sea. After nearly four hours, Susan, exhausted and barely able to walk, finally made it ashore. Her family did not.

Wracked by survivor guilt, Susan began to rebel against the world, charging down a path of self-destruction. Though barely able to look after herself, she became a mother at twenty and had to navigate for two. It was not until many years later, when Susan cheated death for a second time, that she learned to love herself, and life again. 

​Written in a brutally honest manner, The Girl Who Lived is a candid, dramatic and powerful memoir for anyone who has ever lost their way.


What has Rotaract done for me?

Given that District Governor Lynne Westland has promoted the importance of Rotaract at the recent District Conference, it is time to share a Rotaract story. Rotaractors are an important part of District 9820.
From Rotary Voices Posted on March 13, 2017 By Emily Wood, Rotaract Club of South-West Brisbane

By Emily Wood, Rotaract Club of South-West Brisbane, Australia

I’ve been a member of Rotaract — Rotary’s community service and professional development program for young leaders age 18-30 — for ten years. As I age out or “graduate,” I’ve started thinking about what Rotaract has done for me and how it’s shaped who I am today. A decade is a long time to stick with something. So, why have I?

Opportunity. Through Rotaract, I’ve had the opportunity to do many amazing things:

  • I’ve traveled the world to experience different cultures and participate in projects.
  • I’ve lived and studied abroad as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar.
  • I’ve attended four Rotary International Conventions (Montreal, Bangkok, Lisbon and Sydney) where I’ve heard from and connected with some truly impressive individuals who are making the world a better place.
  • I’ve attended RYLA (Rotary Youth Leadership Award), a week-long personal and professional development program that helps you figure out what you want in life and equips you with the skills you need to achieve your goals.
  • I’ve received training in leadership, time management, project planning, event coordination, public speaking, governance, and much more.
  • I’ve served on local, national and international committees, helping shape the future of this great organisation.
  • I’ve been given free rein to develop and implement public relations, marketing and advertising campaigns for my club and district.

Experience. At the age of 23, I was invited to serve on the Rotary District 9630 Public Relations Committee. In my first year, I helped deliver new brand positioning (informed by research I undertook as part of my post-graduate degree), a bus advertising campaign, a new district website, new marketing collateral, and media and communication skills training. I will be forever grateful to the Rotarians who put their faith in me, and gave me the opportunity to test and further develop my skills. Not many people receive opportunities like this so early in their careers.

Confidence. Long gone is the girl who was terrified of public speaking — or even putting forward opinions in a meeting. Rotaract helped me overcome my fears. It’s amazing how fear slips away when you are in a comfortable, supportive environment, surrounded by people who share your passions. As president of my club, I gained invaluable people and project management skills, and developed the confidence to chair meetings, plan projects and run training sessions. I’ve since served as a keynote speaker and panelist at local, national and international conferences, speaking to audiences of 200-plus people. I’ve also established a reputation at work for being calm and confident under pressure.

Life-long friendships. Rotaract has given me the most amazing network of friends — here at home and in almost every corner of the globe. These wonderful individuals have made my life so much richer. They are passionate and talented, and make a real and tangible difference in the lives of others. We’ve shared many adventures and I look forward to sharing many more.

This week is World Rotaract Week. It’s the last time I’ll be celebrating as a Rotaractor, but not the last time I’ll be celebrating this great organisation.

If you’re a young adult aged 18 to 30 interested in helping others, developing new skills and having a great time, then Rotaract is for you. Find a club and get involved — you won’t regret it!

Celebrate World Rotaract Week 13-19 March. Share what you are doing on social using #WorldRotaractWeek to be featured on our hashtag wall.

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